The Newcastle Herald

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A survey of Yengo National Park, Wollemi National Park and surrounding country has uncovered significant art and artefacts, including ochre fragments, grinding groove sites and stone arrangements. The survey, funded by FNPW, covered a total of 67 sites, the majority of which miraculously survived the devastating black summer bushfire season.

Aboriginal elder Warren Taggart led the survey team that discovered the unrecorded sites. Some of the art could disappear in the next 50 years due to erosion from the weather, which is one of the reasons the surveys are considered important.

The Aboriginal rock art in the survey area is “up to 7000 years old. Some could even be older,” Mr Taggart said.

Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife chief executive Ian Darbyshire said the survey was “an extremely important contribution to preserving our Indigenous heritage”.

“We are committed to the ongoing protection of Aboriginal sites. Through grant funding, we can continue to support the work being done by passionate individuals and community.”

 

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