The Newcastle Herald

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A survey of Yengo National Park, Wollemi National Park and surrounding country has uncovered significant art and artefacts, including ochre fragments, grinding groove sites and stone arrangements. The survey, funded by FNPW, covered a total of 67 sites, the majority of which miraculously survived the devastating black summer bushfire season.

Aboriginal elder Warren Taggart led the survey team that discovered the unrecorded sites. Some of the art could disappear in the next 50 years due to erosion from the weather, which is one of the reasons the surveys are considered important.

The Aboriginal rock art in the survey area is “up to 7000 years old. Some could even be older,” Mr Taggart said.

Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife chief executive Ian Darbyshire said the survey was “an extremely important contribution to preserving our Indigenous heritage”.

“We are committed to the ongoing protection of Aboriginal sites. Through grant funding, we can continue to support the work being done by passionate individuals and community.”

 

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The Sydney Morning Herald

Before the Black Summer fires savaged Australia’s landscapes there were signs that some populations of koalas were beginning to stabilise after years of terrible decline.

Up to a third of the surviving population was killed in the fires, and if trends continue the WWF predicts the animal will be extinct in the state by 2050.

The Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife, in partnership with Friends of the Koala Inc, L'occitane and One Tree Planted, launched an expansion of the charity’s tree planting efforts.

On a warm wet morning, the volunteers showed off neat ranks of over 25,000 saplings, ready to be planted in fire-ravaged habitats. With the extra funding, they will produce another 240,000 feed and habitat trees over the next three years and expand the adjoining koala hospital, which already receives up to 400 patients a year.

Go to The Sydney Morning Herald

The Sunday Telegraph

COLOUR IN TO HELP THE KOALAS

The Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife, the charity partner for Australia's National Parks, is helping to rebuild the habitats of our native animals following last year's bushfire season by planting one million trees.

Did you know koalas can eat as much as 1kg of leaves a day? Koalas are also very territorial, living in small communities with their family and friends.

To help the koalas, FNPW and the Funday Telegraph are inviting you to help plant trees.

Go to The Sunday Telegraph

50 years of growing parks and saving species

Koala in Tree - Donate Australian Wildlife - FNPW - Wildlife Donation Australia - FNPW

Reflecting on the last 50 years, we have collectively achieved so many valuable milestones that have contributed to the overall biodiversity and expansion of our natural environments across Australia. It is our promise that moving forward, we will continue to build on this important work for generations to come. Thank you for your ongoing support.

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