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conservation projects

FNPW supports a vast range of projects across Australia that impact every one of us.

Your support allows us to invest in projects that protect threatened wildlife and habitats, create and grow national parks, and so much more…

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all our current projects

At FNPW, we support community conservation groups and individuals and also partner with government agencies and like-minded organisations to manage projects that maximise our coverage and impact across Australia. Search the map to find a project near you.

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Heritage Estates

Heritage Estates is an important tract of natural vegetation that contains a wide range of species and allows them to travel between Booderee National Park and other habitats. Developing it would isolate the species within Booderee, making it a much less healthy habitat and ecosystem.
Go to Heritage Estates

Eastern Bristlebird

Helmet Ridge in NSW is grassy open forest and wetland habitat that is home to the threatened Eastern Bristlebird. Environmental weeds and the resulting reduction of tall native grasses has made their survival in the area increasingly difficult.
Go to Eastern Bristlebird

Caught on Camera

Caught on Camera is an innovative NatureWatch project that involves working with local community groups, land holders and contracted professional ecologists to carry out community based, long term monitoring of wildlife using motion-sensing cameras. The project involves bringing these groups together to develop the project objectives and methods and train volunteers in the use of remote sensing cameras...
Go to Caught on Camera

Feather-leaved Banksia of WA

Rising from the Ashes - the Feather-leaved Banksia - the critically endangered Feather-leaved Banksia Banksia brownii will receive much needed conservation attention. Banksias don't live forever, they get old and susceptible to disease. They need fire to release seeds and recruit new plants.
Go to Feather-leaved Banksia of WA

Christmas Island Reptiles

Reptile species only found on Christmas Island are being saved from extinction through a captive breeding program established in 2009. Since then, FNPW and our supporters have funded two projects in 2013 and 2015 to house the growing reptile populations.
Go to Christmas Island Reptiles

Kukundi Nature Playspace

To coincide with National Tree Day, Kukundi Nature Playspace was unveiled at a launch event in Lane Cove National Park on Friday, 28 July 2017. The outdoor space features a range of new Nature Play equipment that aims to reconnect kids with nature and the outdoors.
Go to Kukundi Nature Playspace

Koala Tree Planting

Over the past 20 years more than 70% of the Manna Gum community has been lost and without intervention we will lose this unique and rare habitat type, along with the koalas and many other plants and animals that rely on it.
Go to Koala Tree Planting

Granite Island Little Penguins

The Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor) is the smallest species of penguin in the world, with an average height of just 33 cms. They are found only on the southern coastlines of Australia and New Zealand. Populations of Little Penguins are facing serious decline. On Granite Island in South Australia, numbers have fallen from 1548 in 2001 to just 22 in 2015.
Go to Granite Island Little Penguins

Lane Cove Bushcare Program 2018

To support the Lane Cove National Park’s volunteer programs, FNPW provided valuable funding to replenish resources for the Lane Cove Bush Care Program, enabling them to purchase additional bush regeneration kits, gloves, herbicide and herbicide applicators, weed bags, and tree planting equipment.
Go to Lane Cove Bushcare Program 2018

Bushfire Recovery Small Grants

As part of FNPW’s Healing our Land initiative, our focus is to repair the damage inflicted on our country following devastating bushfire events. With over 12 million hectares of national park and bushland affected in the 2020 fires and an estimated one billion native animals losing their lives, the initiative will focus on the regeneration and recovery of Australia’s flora and fauna.
Go to Bushfire Recovery Small Grants

Manly Little Penguins

FNPW funds the Manly Little Penguin Program to manage this endangered population. Funds go towards monitoring of the Little Penguin population, provision of resources for volunteers and education activities.
Go to Manly Little Penguins

Black Cockatoo Corridor

This Plant a Tree For Me project aims to revegetate additional Allocasuarina Verticulata (She-Oak) at Blowhole Beach for food of Black Glossy Cockatoos as apart of project to provide food for when these birds cross again to the mainland.
Go to Black Cockatoo Corridor

Seagrass Collaboration

Currently, a wealth of data on seagrass exists in various formats and is held by a multitude of stakeholders across the state. There is a need for coordination and collation of these datasets to optimise their use throughout research, monitoring and management.
Go to Seagrass Collaboration

Aussie Ark Quolls

The Eastern quoll project has been highly successful, starting with 20 individuals in early 2018, with an aim of reaching 70 individuals and doubling our holding enclosures at Aussie Ark.
Go to Aussie Ark Quolls

Tangaroa Blue

FNPW works with Tangaroa Blue to reduce the amount of rubbish entering our waterways and ocean. Over 800 species worldwide are impacted by marine debris. They need our help to survive a crisis hidden beneath the waves. More effective than cleaning up beaches is preventing rubbish from ending up there in the first place.
Go to Tangaroa Blue

Community Conservation Grants

FNPW's Community Conservation Grants program contributes to the protection of Australia's native species, habitats, landscapes and cultural heritage by providing funding for field projects and education programs that have a direct nature conservation outcome.
Go to Community Conservation Grants

Red-Tailed Phascogale

The Red-Tailed Phascogale (Phascogale calura) was once wide-spread across southern Australia, but is now limited to a ‘triangle’ in south-west WA. Loss of habitat (wandoo / sheoak woodland) and predation by feral and domestic cats have been catastrophic for the species. It is listed as Endangered under the EPBC Act.
Go to Red-Tailed Phascogale

Green Parrot Breeding Project

Degraded habitat will be restored on Phillip Island due to the construction of an on-island nursery for endemic and threatened plants. A sense of ownership will grow as community members participate in running the nursery, propagating, and planting on Phillip Island. Before this, Phillip Island (6 km off Norfolk Island) was been stripped of plants and topsoil by introduced rabbits, pigs, and goats.
Go to Green Parrot Breeding Project

Mt Schank Walking Trail

When you visit South Australia's Mount Schank State Heritage Area you can enjoy a new stone path to the volcano rim. Before this new track, the existing stairs did not meet Australian Standards and visitors often climbed beside the stairs instead, which led to erosion and a slipping hazard.
Go to Mt Schank Walking Trail

Devil Ark

Captive breeding programs are saving the Tasmanian Devils from the brink of extinction. As one of the largest living carnivorous marsupials in the world, the endemic Australian animal once roamed throughout mainland Australia...
Go to Devil Ark

WA Bird Watering Stations

The bird waterers in Jirdarup Bushland are specifically designed to aid the survival of local native birdlife, particularly the endangered Carnaby's Black Cockatoos and vulnerable Forest Red-Tailed Black Cockatoos that roost and feed in the area. The structures are popular with all manner of bird species large and small and provide them with clean water all year round.
Go to WA Bird Watering Stations

Backyard Buddies

Backyard Buddies is a free education initiative run by the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife. It gives you simple tips to transform your backyard into a safe and inviting habitat haven. You can explore, create and help your own backyard buddies, to help them survive and to thrive into the future.
Go to Backyard Buddies

Youth Wildlife Ambassadors

The Phillip Island Youth Wildlife Ambassador program is designed to get younger people in the local community involved in helping protect nature and wildlife on the island. Seven ambassadors were selected for this year's program, two more than originally expected. Each prospective ambassador had to apply online and answer a series of questions.
Go to Youth Wildlife Ambassadors

Mount Field National Park

FNPW provided funding to improve access to Mount Field National Park in Tasmania. The alpine area of this popular park attracts a large number of visitors; however, this has led over the years to a degraded track prone to flooding.
Go to Mount Field National Park

Remarkable Southern Flinders

The Remarkable Southern Flinders project offers a rare opportunity to link well established national parks and conservations parks with land recently acquired for conservation and reservoir area opened for public use, to create a vast, connected park of national significance. 
Go to Remarkable Southern Flinders

Garner’s Beach Cassowary Rehabilitation Centre Project

In Australia, the Cassowary is listed as endangered with numbers at around 1,500 to 2,000. But these are guesstimates; no one knows for sure. That’s because Cassowaries live alone in dense forests and they’re hard to count. Cassowary males and females look pretty much the same when they’re young, but females eventually grow about a foot taller, reaching some six feet. They start breeding at age four or five and can live 40 years or more.
Go to Garner’s Beach Cassowary Rehabilitation Centre Project

Quolls Around the Monaro

The Spotted-tailed Quoll (aka Tiger Quoll) is the largest native marsupial carnivore left on the Australian mainland. Sadly its population has declined to the point where it now occupies just 50% of its original pre-European range.
Go to Quolls Around the Monaro
Project-Partnerships

We Believe in the Power of People

We partner with governments, organisations, community groups, rangers and individuals all around Australia to make conservation happen. By working in partnership, together we help protect Australia’s wildlife and habitats for future generations.