The Daily Telegraph

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Veterinarians will be able to access better training in order to prepare them for future disasters, following the hundreds of thousands of wildlife deaths during the Black Summer bushfires.

In NSW alone, a minimum of $1.8 million of free vet services are administered to wildlife each year, with this figure estimated to be far greater following recent disasters.

Veterinarians report that many aspects of their formal education had not adequately prepared them for emergency wildlife care.

As a result, The Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife is launching the Wildlife Friendly Vets program as part of its ‘Wildlife Heroes’ project, which aims to support wildlife volunteers around the country.

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Byron Shire News

Wildlife Heroes Grant Funds Custom Built Recovery Avery For Apex Predators

Birds of prey injured and treated on the Northern Rivers will have a custom-built aviary to recover before they are released back into nature. Byron Bay Wildlife Hospital received a grant of $50,000 from the Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife to build the structure and save wildlife.

Founder vet Stephen Van Mill said the free-flight aviary will be located on land owned by the proprietors of Sea Peace, a subtropical forest on 368 acres of regenerated land in Ewingsdale.

"The facility will treat birds of prey, raptors - wedge-tailed eagles, hawks, owls and falcons," he said.

Go to Byron Shire News

The Sydney Morning Herald

Before the Black Summer fires savaged Australia’s landscapes there were signs that some populations of koalas were beginning to stabilise after years of terrible decline.

Up to a third of the surviving population was killed in the fires, and if trends continue the WWF predicts the animal will be extinct in the state by 2050.

The Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife, in partnership with Friends of the Koala Inc, L'occitane and One Tree Planted, launched an expansion of the charity’s tree planting efforts.

On a warm wet morning, the volunteers showed off neat ranks of over 25,000 saplings, ready to be planted in fire-ravaged habitats. With the extra funding, they will produce another 240,000 feed and habitat trees over the next three years and expand the adjoining koala hospital, which already receives up to 400 patients a year.

Go to The Sydney Morning Herald

50 years of growing parks and saving species

Koala in Tree - Donate Australian Wildlife - FNPW - Wildlife Donation Australia - FNPW

Reflecting on the last 50 years, we have collectively achieved so many valuable milestones that have contributed to the overall biodiversity and expansion of our natural environments across Australia. It is our promise that moving forward, we will continue to build on this important work for generations to come. Thank you for your ongoing support.

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