Outback

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Sturt National Park. Photo: Carmen Welss.

The dramatic, yet fragile environment of Outback NSW has held great human significance for many thousands of years. It continues to inspire artists and photographers.

The rich and varied landscape, shining stars, the unique light of sunrise and sunset - the World Heritage Walls of China in Mungo National Park will linger in your memory for a lifetime.

Outback NSW national parks include:

Find out more about Outback NSW national parks at the Office of Environment & Heritage website.


Foundation Projects in Outback NSW

Growing Mungo National Park

The Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife purchased the first 15,700 hectares of Mungo National Park’s estate in 1979, ensuring the protection of the unique landforms and archaeological sites.

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Frogs, Flow and Rainfall in the Murray Darling Basin

The Foundation is supporting Ms Jo Ocock, PhD candidate of the University of New South Wales to undertake research into restoring the life back to the degraded wetlands of the Murray Darling Basin. It will do this by finding and describing the relationships between frogs and the flow regime of inland floodplain wetlands.

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Mutawintji National Park

In 1979, the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife purchased and fenced 10,000 hectares, in the Coturaundee Ranges, now part of Mutawintji National Park, for the conservation and protection of the Yellow-footed Rock Wallaby.

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Sturt National Park

The Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife acquired 187,899 hectares (Mount King Station) as the core of Sturt National Park, more than half of the total park area.

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Mallee Cliffs National Park

The entire 57,969 hectares of Mallee Cliffs National Park were purchased by the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife, preserving the habitat of the endangered Mallee Fowl.

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Lachlan Valley State Conservation Area

The Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife partnered with the Federal Government and the New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service to acquire a $5 million, 20,000 hectare property called 'Hunthawang' to add to Lachlan Valley State Conservation Area in 2011.

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